Yolanda Scott is upgrading from the crowbar she keeps in her purse, to a pistol after Trump won.

Scott, is an African-American, and she is one of the many minorities who have been bum rushing  gun stores in order to protect themselves, because they are scared that Trump’s win will create more hate crimes.

Since the election, Scott and her family and friends have tried not to venture outside, except to go to work and come back home. When she had to get gas for her car, she made sure she stopped at a station where other people were around.

“You feel that racists now feel like they can attack us just because the president is doing it,” one gun shop owner told NBC News.

Gun store owners told NBC News that since November 8, they’re seeing up to four times as many minority customers.  Black gun groups are have reported double the regular number of attendees at their meetings since the election.

Racial tension was already high during the election, with a large number of videoed shootings and deaths of black men by police officers, followed by the protests and the fatal ambushes of white police officers.

From Chicago to Ferguson, to Baltimore, African-Americans felt they were targeted and angry, sending marchers into the streets and creating chaos.

Trump’s surprise victory this month has done nothing to curb the racial violence. In fact, it seems to have encouraged more open displays of hatred. More than 700 reports have already been reported to the Southern Poverty Law Center just since November 8.

October saw 2.3 million FBI background checks for gun sales, an all-time record; and the 18th month in a row to set a new high. November could be on pace to break that.

Racial tension was already at a high during the election, with a spate of videoed shootings and deaths of black men by police officers, followed by ardent protests and the fatal targeting of white police officers.

From Ferguson to Chicago to Baltimore, African-Americans felt targeted and angry, sending marchers into the streets and communities on edge.

For anxious minorities, it’s yet another foreboding sign of how Trump can whip up his fans to magnify and echo messages of intolerance. And when they compare his full-throated denunciation of a piece of musical theater to his garbled, terse, and delayed disavowals of the support by white supremacists, they see a wink and a nod, and fear it’s a nudge.