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AMERICAN EDUCATION ALERT: The Handwriting Is NOT On The Wall

This is probably not a subject that flies high on your radar, but maybe it should. Most will agree that social engineering in public schools has dismantled the fabric of our country in blatant and not so blatant ways. A more subtle, but effective undermining of educational value has been happening in classrooms for decades, and that is the removal of cursive handwriting from curriculums. Here’s why it’s important to the education of your children and the future of our nation.

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This TIME article succinctly outlines why it is very important to continue to teach cursive in schools, regardless of what current day Common Core educrats espouse.

If nothing is done, as time goes by, eventually cursive handwriting will die out as the population ages, so it will be irrelevant in modern day communication. And while typing skills are essential, today, in this high tech culture, what about our ability to read and understand what happened in the past? The founders didn’t have hand held devices to pen the Declaration of Independence. Who will be able to read it, in 50 years?

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 17:  The signature of George Washington, the first president of the United States, is seen on a letter he wrote regarding the United States' constitution, at Christie's Auction House on June 17, 2013 in New York City. The letter is expected to be sold for $1,000,000 - $2,000,000.  (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – JUNE 17: The signature of George Washington, the first president of the United States, is seen on a letter he wrote regarding the United States’ constitution, at Christie’s Auction House on June 17, 2013 in New York City. The letter is expected to be sold for $1,000,000 – $2,000,000. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Kids can’t read the Declaration of Independence!

At least not the original, pen and ink version. Butt waxed about the thrill of reading the Emancipation Proclamation or the Bill of Rights in their founding forms—and what a travesty it is to raise Americans who would look at those documents as if they were written in hieroglyphics. “So that students are able to read our most valued historical documents in their original form,” reads a New Jersey proposal, “this bill requires that cursive be included in the public school curriculum.”

What about signatures? Most American institutions still require signature documentation. Why? Because printing is easier to forge.

American institutions still require signatures for things!

Butt provided the example of needing to both sign and print one’s name to receive a registered letter at the post office, as well signing one’s name to support a candidate for public office. More generally, one’s John Hancock is a tool that can provide security; experts have said that printed letters are easier to forge.

Far be it from parents and dedicated educators to want higher development for their students. It has been proven that learning cursive writing is great for brain development.

It’s good for our minds!

Research suggests that printing letters and writing in cursive activate different parts of the brain. Learning cursive is good for children’s fine motor skills, and writing in longhand generally helps students retain more information and generate more ideas. Studies have also shown that kids who learn cursive rather than simply manuscript writing score better on reading and spelling tests, perhaps because the linked-up cursive forces writers to think of words as wholes instead of parts.

It’s also great for people who wish to overcome learning disabilities.

Some people need it!

As Maria Konnikova outlines in this New York Timespiece, some people suffer brain injuries that damage their ability to write and understand print—while their ability to comprehend cursive remains. Researchers have also, she notes, suggested that cursive can serve as a teaching aid for children with learning impairments like dyslexia.

So, even if you can’t get your local public school to turn bad education decisions around and bring back cursive writing to the classroom, you can do it yourself. Here are some great curriculums you can use to teach your own kids. Take the time, it’s worth it. Your kids are worth it.

Handwriting Without Tears

Joy of Handwriting

Getty-Dubay

Draw Write Now

Keep in mind, you can, if you wish buy a curriculum, but teaching handwriting is not rocket science. You can also simply google handwriting work sheets from the net and spend 10 minutes a day with your kids teaching them at the kitchen table. Before you know it, they’ll be scribing like pros.

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