Latest Headlines

[VIDEO] Canada Dealing With Violent Refugee Children

Syrian refugee children pose as they play near their families' residence at Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, January 30, 2016. REUTERS/ Muhammad Hamed

Syrian refugee children pose as they play near their families’ residence at Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, January 30, 2016. REUTERS/ Muhammad Hamed

The title of this article is actually incorrect.  Canada is finding itself incapable of dealing with violent refugees.  It’s gotten so bad that the schools are having to separate the girls and the boys to prevent assault, sexual or other after a first grade girl was being harassed by a group of refugees.  The trouble seems to be central to Calgary.  The schools aren’t publicizing the problems for politically correct reasons and was only made known when the school had to honor a freedom of information request.

The refugees refuse to assimilate and Canadians refuse to convert to Islam en masse.  Did I happen to mention these violent refugees have something in common?  They are all from Syria.  That’s the same Syrian refugees Obama wants to import into the United States and Hillary has promised to increase entry to the United States by 550% over what Obama wants to bring in.  The Syrian refugees are punching, slapping and throwing rocks at the Canadian kids.

The Conservative Tribune:

“We have basically decided to separate [the boys from the girls] because of our lack of success with mitigating the boys’ violent behavior,” the principal continued, before asking higher-ups for “some direction as to how I should proceed with this.”

In another email with the subject line “Comments of serious concern,” the principal noted that a first-grade Syrian boy, who — upon finding out his teacher was not a Muslim — said, “You guys don’t believe in God so it would be better to kill you.”

Similarly, a middle school principal wrote to the board, “Some of the boys in our Syrian student cohort are setting up conflict based on religious beliefs. I propose a system-created way of responding to this, and of teaching our cultural values. It’s very sensitive — we are un-teaching foundational beliefs.”

To Top