Crime

University of Missouri Suspends Professor Click Who Called for Attack on Reporter

Click

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The University of Missouri has reacted to charges filed against Melissa Click, Associate Professor of Communications, for the third degree assault charges filed against her, by suspending her pending an investigation into whether further disciplinary action is required.  One hundred members of the state House of Representatives and eighteen from the Senate, called for the firing of Click.

Here is the video of her infraction.  Pay close attention to her call for some muscle to toss out a reporter:

The official announcement of Click’s suspension was made by Board Curator Pam Henrickson:

“The Board of Curators directs the General Counsel, or outside counsel selected by General Counsel, to immediately conduct an investigation and collaborate with the city attorney and promptly report back to the Board so it may determine whether additional discipline is appropriate.”

At the same meeting, Curator Yvonne S. Sparks of St. Louis, who was appointed to the board in 2015 announced her retirement citing conflicting responsibilities:

“After careful consideration of the demands of my professional obligations and those required to engage in the work of the Board at the level that I expect of myself, I have concluded that it is not possible to do both well,” Sparks said. “This is an important and demanding time for the System, the role deserves a representative that is able to that devote.”

Besides displaying incredibly poor judgement in attempting to have a college reporter assaulted while exercising his right to cover the protest, but she also showed poor timing.  She is not yet a tenured professor, meaning her job is dangling by a string, but she was up for a tenure vote.  Her fellow professors have written a letter of support for Click but with the legislators that write the budget and designate money for education favoring her firing, she may already be gone and the investigation is just to follow procedures.

If convicted, Click could receive up to one year in jail and a one thousand dollar fine.

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