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[VIDEO] Solving This Optical Illusion Reveals if You are a Genius

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Originally, this optical illusion was used to tell who had right handed brains and who had left handed brains.  While watching it, some people see her spinning clockwise.  Some see her spinning counter clockwise and some see her spinning both directions.

An optical illusion featuring the silhouette of a dancer doing a pirouette is playing tricks on our visual perception – some see her spinning clockwise, counterclockwise or switching between the two – and for years it used to test IQ and which side of the brain was more dominate

SPINNING DANCER 

The optical illusion was created by the Japanese Flash designer Nobuyuki Kayahara in 2003 and for many years, was used to determine whether people are right-brain (creative) or left-brain (logical) dominant.

However, recent studies reveal that it does not deal with areas of the brain, but our perspective.

Most people see her spinning clockwise because we tend to choose a viewpoint from above rather than below.

 Another reason for our clockwise bias is an attentional bias that leans towards the right side of the body.

 There is also a trick to see her switch between directions.

‘Cover up everything but her foot touching the ground,’ said Arthur Shapiro, a computer science professor at American University.

Stay focused on the foot and the shadow beneath her as she spins.

‘Now imagine you are physically moving up or down in space.’

When you imagine yourself below the dancer she should spin counterclockwise and clockwise if you envision yourself above her.

The dancer is reversible image in the class of optical illusions, meaning, even though she spins, she displays 'similarities to other static illusions' like the Necker cube (pictured), which can be viewed in two ways: the lower right panel is in the front or it placed in the back

Shapiro also reveals that you don’t have to be a genius to see the dancer switch directins.

‘Cover up everything but her foot touching the ground,’ he said.

Stay focused on the foot and the shadow beneath her as she spins.

‘Now imagine you are physically moving up or down in space.’

‘If you want her to switch directions, look at her as if you’re filming her from below.

‘Now pretend to be filming her from above.’

When you imagine yourself below the dancer she should spin counterclockwise and clockwise if you envision yourself above her.

A 2010 study reveals that most people will see the figure spin around clockwise, as we tend to choose a viewpoint from above rather than below, reports BrainDecoder.

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